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Thursday, May 7, 2020 | History

3 edition of Legitimate use of military force against state-sponsored international terrorism found in the catalog.

Legitimate use of military force against state-sponsored international terrorism

Richard J. Erickson

Legitimate use of military force against state-sponsored international terrorism

by Richard J. Erickson

  • 138 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Air University Press, For sale by the Supt. of Docs., US G.P.O. in Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala, Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Terrorism.,
  • Self-defense (International law),
  • Military law.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesState-sponsored terrorism.
    Statementby Richard J. Erickson.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsJX5420 .E75 1989
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 267 p. ;
    Number of Pages267
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2195517M
    LC Control Number89015038

    Terrorism is the use of violence (often against civilian targets) to instill fear, generate publicity, and sometimes destabilize governments. Generally speaking, small groups fighting against powerful states practice terrorism, but governments also have the ability to practice terrorism. Terrorism is the systematic use of violence (terror) as a means of coercion for political purposes. In the international community, terrorism has no legally binding, criminal law definition. Common definitions of terrorism refer only to those violent acts which are intended to create fear (terror); are perpetrated for a religious, political, or ideological goal; and deliberately target or.

    Military actions primarily directed against non-combatant targets have also been referred to as state terrorism. For example, the bombing of Guernica has been called an act of terrorism. Other examples of state terrorism may include the World War II bombings of Pearl Harbor, London, Dresden, Chongqing, and Hiroshima.. An act of sabotage, sometimes regarded as an act of terrorism, was the. State terrorism can be directed externally against adversaries in the international domain or internally against domestic enemies. Dissident Terrorism Terrorism "from below" committed by nonstate movements and groups against governments, ethnonational groups, religious groups, and other perceived enemies.

      See, e.g., Lt. Col. (U.S.) R.J. Erickson, Legitimate Use of Military Force against State-Sponsored International Terrorism (Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.: Air University Press, ). 8. For purposes of brevity, so-called economic terrorism will not Cited by: 3. It is this last element - targeting innocent civilians - that stands out in efforts to distinguish state terrorism from other forms of state violence. Declaring war and sending the military to fight other militaries is not terrorism, nor is the use of violence to punish criminals who have been convicted of violent crimes.


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Legitimate use of military force against state-sponsored international terrorism by Richard J. Erickson Download PDF EPUB FB2

"Legitimate Use of Military Force Against State-Sponsored International Terrorism" is an excellent and readable treatise, highly researched and footnoted, and accessible to both professionals and laymen.4/5(2). Title: Legitimate Use of Military Force Against State-Sponsored International Terrorism Corporate Author: AIR UNIV MAXWELL AFB AL Personal Author(s): Erickson, Richard JCited by: Legitimate Use Of Military Force Against State-sponsored International Terrorism by Erickson, Richard J.

and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at -- International law and international terrorism: which approach should we take.

-- States have responsibilities as well as rights -- Individual self-defense as a justification for the use of force -- Collective use of force: actions states can take together -- Other legal arguments to justify use of force -- Use of military force: terrible swift sword or lame warning.

Title Legitimate Use of Military Force Against State-Sponsored International Terrorism. Binding Soft Cover. Book Condition Near Fine.

Edition No Stated Edition. Size 8vo - over 7¾" - 9¾" tall. Publisher Maxwell AFB Air University Press Seller ID A military response has been a viable option for combating international terrorism in the past and it will continue to be an option in the future, Possible military actions range from rescuing hostages to neutralizing terrorist camps and making direct strikes against targets verified as the infrastructure for state-sponsored training and support complexes of terrorist groups, The military response is part of a larger strategy that seeks to maximize the risk of punishment for terrorists.

Get this from a library. Legitimate use of military force against state-sponsored international terrorism. [Richard J Erickson; Air University (U.S.). Press.]. Erickson, R. J., Legitimate Use of Military Force Against State-Sponsored International Terrorism (Maxwell Air Force Base, ) Fenrick, W.

J., ‘ A First Attempt to Adjudicate Conduct of Hostilities Offences: Comments on Aspects of the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia Trial Decision in the Prosecutor by: This innovative new book aims to put society's fight against terrorism into a comprehensive crime prevention perspective with a clear, understandable theoretical foundation, developing a general.

Greenwood, C., ‘ International Law and the “War against Terrorism” ’, 78 () International Affairs at –12 Erickson, R. J., Legitimate Use of Military Force Against State-Sponsored International Terrorism (Montgomery, AL, ).

] Self-Defence and State-Sponsored Terrorism Part IV will discuss the move by states to take countermeasures against terrorist activity, developing internal mechanisms by which terrorists may be criminally prosecuted.

Part V will then discuss the enshrined norms on the use of force regime proscribed in the UN Charter. It will argue that the. 46 See Gregory M Travalio, ‘Terrorism, International Law, and the Use of Military Force’ (), 18 Wisconsin International law Journal47 See Lillich & Paxman, above n 30 at Author: Jackson Maogoto.

Author: Major Kenneth E. Johnston, United States Air Force Thesis: America must call on its standing force, the United States military, to combat world-wide terrorism. Background: Terrorism is on. TERR ORISM, STATE RESPONSIBILITY AND THE USE OF ARMED FORCE René Värk This article looks at international terrorism from the perspective of inter- Legitimate Use of Military Force against State-Sponsored Inter-national Terrorism.

Maxwell Air Force. Challenges”, Singapore Year Book of International Law, vol. 11 (), pp. ; M. Wood, “Terrorism and the International Law on the Use of Force,” in B.

Saul (ed.), Research Handbook on International Law and Terrorism (), pp 2 R. Zacklin, The United Nations Secretariat and the Use of Force in a Unipolar World: Power Size: 68KB. STATE RESPONSIBILITY AND THE USE OF FORCE. The law enforcement approach to terrorism applies domestic law, while the conflict management (use of force) approach applies international law, which includes the law of armed conflict, state responsibility, and the customary inherent right of anticipatory by:   1 Introduction.

The legal rules governing the use of force form the core of modern international law. The ban on the use of force is widely held to be peremptory in nature, and has often been described as the ‘cornerstone’ of the modern international system.1 The latter statement in particular suggests a sense of immutability: cornerstones not only cannot be removed (if the edifice Cited by: the use of military force did, and did not do, when applied against state-sponsored terrorism.

It will establish that, under certain conditions, the political and strategic gains resulting from the use of military force against terrorism justifies continued consideration of this option.

TheseFile Size: KB. Many people make the argument that terrorism is an illegitimate use of force. This creates a serious dilemma in my mind; who decides what force is legitimate and what force is illegitimate. I guess you would then say that the answer to this is the United Nations.

However, who gives the United Nations the right. The United States of America has at various times in recent history provided support to terrorist and paramilitary organizations across the world. It has also provided assistance to numerous authoritarian regimes that have used state terrorism as a tool of repression.

United States support to non-state terrorists has been prominent in Latin America, the Middle-East, and Southern Africa. From. distinction between armed and non-armed conflict, the State use of counter-terrorist force and the return of “terrorists” who have been fighting abroad.

Notwithstanding the absence of a globally agreed, legal definition of terrorism, an effective and prevention-focused international response to terrorism is highly desirable, particularly.The New Terrorism The Nature of the War on Terrorism MICHAEL W.

KOMETER, Major, This study develops guidelines for military strategy against the insurgents by using the same analytical framework to assess the in- “This is a turning point in the international war on terrorism.

This is .The Politics of Terrorism: Power, Legitimacy, and Violence Richard A. Couto1 The final part is an examination of terrorism by, for, and against the state, that (successfully) claims the monopoly of the legitimate use of physical force within a given territory (p.

78). The power of the state adheres to its right to permit groups and.